Thursday, August 1, 2013

PARIS - A Door

What do they mean to you?

Doors let us in or keep us inside, they make us wonder what's behind them. A door allows us to pass from one location to another. A doorway can also be called a portal. Much can be learned from the size, design and the materials used to craft the door.


In a building in old Paris . . .


Paris Doors, Marais, by DG Hudson


Behind these bright blue doors is an 18th century building with residential apartments on four floors above the 1st floor entrance. You need strong arms to open and shut these sturdy, heavy doors. The size and thickness speak of earlier times.


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Or the front door of a famous artist from the 1800s. . .

In a different century, the Van Gogh Brothers, Vincent and Theo, lived behind these simple blue doors. This famous artist site in Montmartre is identified by the plaque to the left of the main door. This route was part of a guide-led small-group walking tour of Montmartre.




Former home of Van Gogh Brothers, Paris, by Green Eye


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A Golden Door fit for a King. . .

The door in the photograph below is one of the doors into the Royal Inner Chambers at Versailles. Note the royal crown in the top medallion. Only those truly in the King's inner circle were allowed beyond these doors.


Versailles, Door to Royal Chambers, by DG Hudson

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In a place of rest. . .

In Pere Lachaise, doors add to the design interest of the monuments. The arched door on the left of the photo below opens inward to allow a moment's reflection. Further up the hill, other structures beckon us onwards.



Pere Lachaise Cemetery, Paris, by DG Hudson


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Doors at Moulin de Fourges, a French country inn

In the front of the 200-year-old Moulin de Fourges Inn, a river flows by the open deck. The same river provided power when this was a working mill. This picturesque inn located between Giverny and Versailles hosts tour groups for lunch.


 

Doors in a French Country Inn by DG Hudson
 
 
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To a child, there's a whole world of wonder on the other side of any door. To an animal at the vet's, his worst nightmare is on the other side of any of those doors.

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How do you interpret doors? Have you used doors in your writing to signify an underlying meaning? Please share in the comments and thanks for dropping by!


For more Doors, see this post by fellow blogger, The Words Crafter, it's another take on doors and how interesting they can be.

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A link to The Doors, in case you were looking for that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XWQrt00_NM The Doors, Roadhouse Blues

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References:

http://thewordscrafter.blogspot.ca/2013/07/fascination-doors.html The Words Crafter's blog - The Journey South, Fascination Doors.

http://dghudson.blogspot.ca/2012/01/paris-pere-lachaise-cemetery.html Blogpost about Pere Lachaise Cemetery.

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33 comments:

  1. I always take photos of interesting doors when I'm traveling. I guess it's the idea of it being a portal to something unknown that intrigues me. There's possibility in doors. And sometimes they just have beautiful, old-world charm.

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    1. Exactly, LG. I like doors and windows. Old-world charm gets me every time. . .

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  2. Like L. G., my husband loves to take pictures of doors when we travel. To me, doors and doorways suggest other worlds or a step into the past.

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    1. I look for doors and windows that are unique. It's a habit.

      Perhaps sometimes, you can share those door photos. Thanks for visiting.

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  3. I love shooting pics of doors too. Architecture is interesting to me.

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    1. I've seen some of your door photos, JoJo, and I like them. We are photo historians.

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  4. Who would have thought a post about doors would be so interesting!

    I have a strange fascination with doors I must say. As in wondering, who or what is on the other side. Are they lonely? Are they sad? etc ...

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    1. Curiosity is a great skill for a writer. It's a form of research. . .

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  5. I wish my house had that door fit for a king, I would feel like a queen every time I enter it!

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    1. The crown and the golden glow help foster that image, don't they? I developed a liking for gilt when I visited France. Thanks for visiting, Hayley-Eszti. (You could always re-decorate your own door, get a friend to help)

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  6. I love photographing beautiful entrances, especially abroad.

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    1. It seems like there are more beautiful entrances abroad. Have you featured some of these photos you've taken?

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  7. How did I miss this?!! Oh, you make me want to go to France!!!!!! I loved reading about the history of these doors and can you believe? I didn't know Vincent van Gogh had a brother!!!

    I loved you perspective and the idea of portals. And it's fun to realize that there are so many others with the same fascination.

    Thanks for the reference!

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    1. My pleasure to reference your blog, Words Crafter. You should read the book 'Dear Theo' by Irving Stone (autobiography) You might enjoy it, I did. Hubs read it too. I love reading about artists and musician's lives to find out what makes them tick.

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    2. thanks for the book ref. i'll be looking for it!

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  8. Hi DG .. as you saw I referenced doors as openings to the world beyond ... because I linked across to meeting bloggers, the art nouveau movement in Brussels .. and links in history ..

    We never know what happens behind closed doors - stories galore ... horrors, love ... hard work of creative spirits ...

    Those French doors are fascinating .. love the arch way to the cemetery ... the golden door leading to the King ...

    I note LG's word 'portal' .. it is a portal of the mind ... we make what we want of what we see the of door, the wood, the colour, the knocker, the cracks ...

    Interesting .. cheers Hilary

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    1. Yes, Hilary, doors will always intrigue me. I thought it interesting that three bloggers all wrote about doors (you, Words Crafter, and me). Perhaps writers have a fixation with them, they let us end a scene, lead to something else and so on. . .

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  9. "People seem wicked, when you're unwanted..." I like the doors on that French country inn -- very inviting.

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    1. Touche! Milo. When you're strange, people like to read your stories, though.

      I could envision spending a writing retreat at this inn. There were a few goats wandering and little sheds - this is a lovely place (even with the tour buses parked a short distance away).

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  10. I've used both doors and windows in my writing, though moreso in short fiction and poetry. Thank you for the door tour! The blue doors weren't remarkable in themselves, but their history was. And I love the door in the cemetery.

    Shannon at The Warrior Muse

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    1. Those blue doors have special meaning for me, least of all that they are in Paris. It's the details and the history that give these objects a life of their own. That cemetery is amazing - history stacked on top of more history.

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  11. Doors generate lots of interest, for the great reasons you name here. Love that blue color, so bright and inviting. Doors ... like walls ... tell stories. Imagine what they'd tell us if "only these walls could talk."

    Silvia @ Silvia Writes

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  12. Great post. I loved how Laini Taylor used doors in Daughter of Smoke and Bone.

    I haven't used them in my writing, but maybe I should...

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    1. Try adding a door element and see how it fits.

      I used windows and doors in the mystery novella I wrote.

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  13. This is a really great post! I love studying architecture, so this was really interesting.

    www.modernworld4.blogspot.com

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  14. I really enjoyed this post. I remember seeing those blue doors of the Van Gogh brothers' house.

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    1. When we were there, a young boy opened one of the doors and came out to get into a car, heading for school, I guess. So, the former Van Gogh home is still in use.
      Thanks, Sherry.

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  15. I love thinking about passing through the same space as people from the past. Shared portals and such. Beautiful post.

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    1. Thanks, glad you liked it. Must be our inquisive nature.

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  16. Those doors pictured are pretty cool, but they'd never get approved by our association run community. They prefer prefab portals that are all uniform in appearance. Kind of sad in a way. We live in a cookie cutter world.

    Lee
    Tossing It Out

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    1. I know what you mean, Lee. Conformity, and usually related to cost. It is sad in many ways.

      In the meantime, I'll keep looking for the NON-cookie cutter doors. . .thanks for visiting.

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