Sunday, February 2, 2014

Great Bear Rainforest Reprieve / BC Museum's New Vision

Resources
A step forward

Conservation groups and forest companies have announced an agreement regarding old growth protection and heritage sites in the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia. 



Islands off the south coast of British Columbia, by DG Hudson

After 14 years of negotiations which included bitter fights in the 1990's, a balance was found. First Nations of BC and the B.C. provincial government will have the final say on the agreement. Will it be the last chapter in achieving protection for old growth and other protected heritage sites? 

Saving the forests, in particular the Great Bear Rainforest, is the first step

Saving food sources is the second step.(On land, in the waters)

Preventing pollution in advance is the third step. Watchdogs are required.


A Spirit Bear or Kermode, a resident of the Great Bear Rainforest, is shown below.



Spirit Bear, or Kermode Bear, BC, Wiki photo

Reference: Vancouver Sun Article,:Westcoast News, Preservation, Collaboration wins rainforest 'final chapter', by Gordon Hoekstra. Jan. 2014. Update on environmental issues in the Great Bear Rainforest.

Related posts:
Oil and Dirty Water - A Bear Dilemma 

The Spirit Bear and the Great Bear Rainforest


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Our Royal British Columbia Museum is changing. . .






A new CEO for the Royal BC Museum in Victoria, Jack Lohman, has already started assessing the treasures in his care. He's revived museums in England, South Africa, Poland, and Norway. He calls it re-scripting, which in BC, will include taking collections around the province and loaning certain exhibitions to other institutions. Lohman has also written a book about his vision, Museums at the Crossroads, which is about some of the choices that institutions make.

I'm hoping these changes will include making art and history exhibitions more accessible to all, and by that I mean no high ticket prices. Learning about our culture is important. Why don't we have a free day once a month for British Columbia's museums and galleries? 

Paris, France does this, an excellent idea that gives something back to the people. It would also benefit school groups, and help offset high ferry rates that deter many from visiting Vancouver Island as much as we would like. Thank you, Mr. Lohman, I'm looking forward to your revitalizing of our venerable museum; a fresh eye can work wonders.


Reference: Vancouver Sun, Westcoast News-Weekend Edition, Jan.25/14, B.C.'s Museum at the Crossroads, by John Mackie.


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Do you scan your newspapers for issues that are important to you? Are you interested in current events in your own city or local area? How do you get your news? (via a device, a newspaper, or secondhand?)

Please share in the comments and thanks for dropping by. I'm always listening.

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12 comments:

  1. I never made the time to visit the Royal BC museum every time I was in Victoria b/c I was on foot and had so many other places to see. Wish I had. :( I'm glad that they've come to an agreement on the forest. I am 100% against cutting of old growth forests.

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    1. Too bad, JoJo, try to see the museum next time. We have taken quite a few relatives and guests to Victoria and visited the museum. We have pre-digital photos.

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  2. Ooh! I love museums. They set my brain on fire...which could actually be a pretty dangerous thing because then what would be left for writing, or my kids... *reevaluating* Perhaps museums aren't the best places for me, but I LOVE national parks! They set my imagination on fire. Doh!

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    1. You know, museums do set your thinking on fire, Crystal, wondering how man in the past accomplished what they did with much less than what we have today. Parks are great too, and preserve as well.

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  3. Museums are amazing places, mainly because of the history that are usually in them. Just like what Crystal said, they set my imagination on fire.

    www.modernworld4.blogspot.com

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    1. Museums are a great way to learn history. Be careful with the fire, though.

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  4. It sounds like good things are in store for your museum.

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    1. I hope so, we haven't been there for a couple of reasons, since there had been little change over the years. I liked the First Nations art, and early BC history.

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  5. Cool about the forests being protected. I worry about the food sources since Fukushima and the Tsunami. I guess we'll see. Great news about the museum. We'll have to go check it out once the changes start. I read my local Bellingham Herald website for news, mostly.

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    1. In times past, I've caught flights out of Bellingham and went antique shopping there.Thanks for stopping by.

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  6. Fourteen years of negotiations? That seems like a lot, but as long as they reached an agreement (and it sounds like a good one) then it's all good. I love the spirit bear pic! Thanks for the museum news. :)

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    1. Trying to reconcile the wants of business and environmentalists is difficult. If the agreement is able to be enforced and there is no quibbling about interpretation. . .then perhaps it will help balance the equation and save a few species.

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