Monday, March 17, 2014

A Bridge in Disassembly - Vancouver, BC

The Port Mann Bridge that connects the Lower Mainland of Vancouver with the Fraser Valley is getting the slow demolition treatment.




Port Mann Bridge #1 in bright orange, March 2014, by DG Hudson


The old bridge on the right is being disassembled. The exposed concrete support now shows under the orange and yellow equipment in the image, since one large section has been removed. Construction on the original Port Mann Bridge began in 1957, was completed in 1964, and closed in 2012. The new bridge has greater capacity, and a more efficient design including an HOV lane. Tolls for most cars are $3 each way. Free old bridge to tolled new bridge, we will go from six lanes to ten when all are completed. There are still  bridge construction 'holdups' at various times, a part of life in the big city.


Pt Mann Bridge #1 (Orange girders) 2014, and cabled Pt. Mann Bridge #2, DG Hudson
  

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The upright supports on the right of the image are loosely strung with cables and form part of the equipment used in stripping the road surface and removing the orange girders. Not sure if any of the bridge pieces are being recycled for another use. Perhaps that explains the slow demo, aside from the reality of those guys working over deep water, the Fraser River.
 
 

Bridge Cables overlap the old Port Mann bridge and the supports by DG Hudson
 

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Shown below is a section of the old bridge with the supports which are assisting in the dismantling or disassembly of the roadway and the arching orange girders. Orange made the bridge more visible on those gray wet days that we get in Vancouver, aka rainforest country.



Port Mann Bridge Disassembly Closeup 2014, Vancouver, by DG Hudson


It's interesting to watch the process when something is being dismantled, as opposed to being demolished. Bridges spanning large rivers or small water sources are one of the things I like about both Vancouver and Paris.

Happy St. Patrick's Day, if you indulge. And watch out for the greenies. . .

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Are you a fan of bridges? Have you ever seen a bridge disassembled?
Please share in the comments and thanks for dropping by!
Are you in the A to Z Challenge yet? If you are, I'll see you there.

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This post is an update of previous posts. Links to those are:

Port Mann Bridge - 1st Update
http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.ca/2013/02/pt-mann-bridge-update-vancouver-views.html

Bridge Across Fraser River and Crepes
http://dghudson.blogspot.ca/2012/06/bridge-across-fraser-river-and-crepes.html

History of the Port Mann Bridge.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Mann_Bridge 

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18 comments:

  1. Very cool pictures. The only real bridge I've seen/driven over is the Golden Gate Bridge, which is truly a surreal experience. Other than that, the only bridges we have around here are made of wood and cross very tiny streams on nature trails (not a lot of water here...).

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    1. I have been across the Golden Gate Bridge, took photos of that one too. I like 'Frisco.

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  2. Every where I've lived has required the use of bridges of one sort or another. Can't get on or off Cape Cod w/o using the Sagamore or Bourne Bridges. Same thing with the San Francisco Bay Area and Western Washington. I love bridges. Commuted over the Golden Gate every day for 3 years and the Richmond/San Rafael for another 3. I've seen bridges being built (the 2nd Tacoma Narrows) but never removed.

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    1. Bridges fascinate me. And I like living near water sources like oceans, rivers, etc.

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  3. It's such a cool looking bridge the way it resembles the sail of a tall ship. Never seen them take one apart before, no.

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    1. This bridge is supposed to be one of the longer bridges of this type of design. It has a long approach. Glad you are back, LG!

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  4. The new bridge reminds me of what we called in elementary school (I think) "string art." It consisted of squares of wood with nails in some sort of pattern. We threaded string to create a "masterpiece." Anyway, it looks fascinatingly modern.

    Happy St. Patty's Day.

    xoRobyn

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    1. I like the design, it doesn't hide the view.

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  5. D.G. ~
    Off-topic but... please don't tell me that the one time you're NOT going to vote on my BOTB is also the one time I featured Canada.

    I even thought of you as I was composing that blog bit and wondered which way you might vote.

    Know now that YOUR vote counts double in this particular blog bit, Hudson. (Unless you vote the opposite way I do. Ha!)

    ~ D-FensDogg
    'Loyal American Underground'

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    1. Not on purpose,. I just sent a comment for your approval on your BOTB.
      I've been dealing with Blogger problems. . .they seem ok for the moment.

      Delete
  6. I do love bridges. Seeing the different types in different areas. You take a massive bridge like this one and compare it to the small old wooden bridges in Indiana (or Illinois, I'm not sure), where they have a covered bridge festival each year. There can be such a vast array.

    However, I don't like the idea of being stuck on a bridge for any period of time. Freaks me out!

    The Warrior Muse

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    1. I love old wooden bridges, Shannon, as long as they are sturdy and have been kept in good repair. I don't like being stuck 'on' anything, but we've seen too many disaster movies with tumbling bridges. . .

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  7. I love bridges, so seeing one being disassembled would be wonderful and sad at the same time.

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    1. I thought it was a bit sad too. An era of a free bridge ends. It's the second toll bridge and seems to be a trend. . .

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  8. I live near Cincinnati. There are several bridges that connect Northern Kentucky to Cincinnati. The weird thing is they each have a name (Brent Spence, Big Mac, etc.) but I have no idea which is which. The bridge I cross has no sign saying which one it is. How do people know??

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    1. I think all bridges and highways ought to have signs. So the locals know, what about newbies?

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  9. A little sad, old and new. Are any of the parts of the old bridge being used anywhere?

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    1. Not sure, loverofwords, but this isn't my a to z entry. That's on the Rainforest Writing blog.

      I hope the old bridge material is at least recycled, which is likely.

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