Sunday, October 5, 2014

The Louvre - Sculpture Confirms An Era


Bigger than life and meant to impress. . ..at the Louvre Museum, Paris.



Antiquities, Louvre Museum, by DG Hudson


Sculpture and massive stone monuments confirm man has existed for centuries, even perhaps many thousands of years. Just as some museums feature bones of reptilian dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures to show Earth inhabitants long ago, it gives man a sense of security to know that even though dynasties and empires thrived and fell, their art survived.  Proof of existence.

Why so large? Monolithic size could be seen from a distance and implied greatness on the part of the person who commissioned the sculpture. Perhaps the image above was to adorn an entrance to a temple, tomb or royal building.

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Sentinels on Guard
Sphinx styled




Sentries in the Louvre, by DG Hudson


Repetitive patterns such as the sentries imply order and make for interesting images. The work would have been done with ancient techniques yet they achieved such regularity. The workers were probably many and had no choice in assisting. In modern times, we speculate and study records to learn how such art came to be.

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A Parade of Man and Horse



An Antiquity Globe with Circular Pattern, The Louvre, Paris, by DG Hudson


All images were found in the Antiquities section of the Louvre Museum. I didn't specify which historical areas as displays may change and my purpose was to see as much as I could of such a treasure trove of history and art.
 
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Art with Inscriptions





These creations of Antiquity document a time when objects were made to last. When man destroys these icons of existence, what do they prove except their own destructive tendencies and lack of understanding of history and its consequences. Museums protect our history and keep it alive for future generations.  To see it firsthand is to learn.  To learn is to broaden your mind.

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Do you enjoy history or museums whether anthropology or art? Do you like sculpture? Modern (Picasso or Zadkine) or Antiquity or all sculpture? If you're not a fan of sculpture or 'old' art, you can say that, too.

Hope you enjoyed this peek into the Antiquities at the Louvre Museum. Please leave a comment to let me know you were here. I'll respond, and thanks for dropping by!

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Additional Posts

The Louvre Museum from the A to Z Blog Challenge
http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.ca/2012/04/l-louvre-museum-to-z-blog-challenge.html

Paris Posts (a page of links to posts and images)
http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.ca/p/paris-posts.html 

More Louvre Museum statuary
http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.ca/2012/03/statuary-at-louvre-study-in-stone.html

PARIS - Antiquities and Bastet at the Louvre
http://dghudson.blogspot.ca/2014/01/paris-antiquities-at-louvre.html

12 comments:

  1. I prefer paintings to sculptures and I don't remember seeing any of these when we visited the Louvre, but as I mentioned before, we were touring everything at break neck speed and I was utterly exhausted that entire trip.

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    1. Group touring is to blame for that, JoJo, who can choose what they want to see and enjoy it on these whirlwind tours. A cousin of mine did Europe in a week and when I asked her impressions, she just said she didn't like most of the food (likely at tourist restaurants. . .)

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  2. Ah, so cool to see the preserved art of those who have long since passed. Especially to see how much has changed in the art we've created over time, and yet at its core a lot of it is the same - just us, documenting one another as we see ourselves... just like I see us as idiotic MSPaint figures. :)

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    1. We are MSPaint figures at times, and future generations will love our art if our electronics survive or the Google Cloud continues. . .somehow that doesn't seem as strong as stone, does it?

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  3. I do enjoy museums and seeing art from the past. It gives a glimpse into the way of thinking of a particular civilization. (It would be nice to know what function that first sculpture had.)

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    1. Yes, I'd like to know where that sculpture was used as well, but we can speculate. . .As a classical musician, you have an appreciation for history and art, just what I'd expect from you.

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  4. You have a great "eye" ---your photos are wonderful, especially the lighting on the first photo.

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    1. Thanks, loverofwords, I love sculpture and that makes photographing it a pleasure. Glad you like them.

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  5. I took my kids to the museum and we stared at all the Egyptian artifacts. Especially the mummies. When I look at all the things they made with their hands, it easy to appreciate the craftsmanship it took to create such beautiful things.

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    1. That's why I took photos Jay, so I could stare at them later and contemplate. Not many museums allow photos especially around paintings but the Louvre has always been' ahead of the crowd.

      Glad you take your kids. In one museum I heard a kid say to his parents (this was in the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller AB (dinosaurs)) 'there's nothing but dead things here. . .'

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  6. I enjoy museums of all kinds. As far as art, I prefer paintings, but I appreciate good sculpture as well..

    Lee
    Tossing It Out

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    1. I like paintings too Lee, since I studied drawing and painting in the uni and college years. I appreciate sculpture, as I'm very fond of Michelangelo's sculptures and others like Ossip Zadkine.

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