Sunday, February 7, 2016

Photograpy - Outtakes

Don't throw those outtakes away!
Use them as tools to determine how to capture a better image.

What makes an outtake an outtake? 

Clutter in the background, vague subject matter, improperly focused or incorrect lighting.


For each of the photos in this post, I'll identify some problems and pointers. There are three things that should always be considered: composition (placement of subjects in image, light (exposure) and clarity (sharpness).


Montmartre Vista

Problems: unknown people cluttering shot, nothing readily identifies this as Montmartre or Paris. As a slice-of-life shot, it's acceptable, but a better vantage point could make a difference in the framing or composition. This location is right below Sacre Coeur.


Montmartre near Sacre Coeur, Paris, Fr. by DG Hudson
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Versailles

Problems: Crowd scene image at Versailles Palace clutters image (this was an extra large group of tourists, per our guide) The golden impression of the gate is diluted and no detail can be seen. 


Wide angle gives more of a view, but reduces detail. (Black is the clothing colour of choice. . .which serves to highlight the contrasting golden hues of the gilt)  Waiting until the crowds clear and getting a closer viewpoint would enhance the detail, and the focus on the towering entrance gate.


Versailles and Tourists, France, by DG Hudson


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Is Traffic Going Beneath the Eiffel Tower?

Problems: An Image of the Eiffel that appears to show traffic going beneath.  This a result of foreshortening of the distance, but no traffic actually goes beneath this icon. In addition: the  very top of the Eiffel Tower has been cut off in this image (a sacrilege) and traffic is given precedence over the monument. 


This image takes advantage of optical illusions caused by distance and vantage point. Changing the distance (depth of field), the height of the point-of-view, and the framing of the Eiffel Tower will improve the results.

Eiffel Tower and Traffic in Paris, by DG Hudson

In summary, you can improve your images if you take more time to compose, but in a snap-and-shoot situation, you have to go with your instincts. Practice improves almost everything (sports, art, writing, etc.) These were location images, but portraits and interior photographs also need some preparation for images appropriate for various types of publication (blogs, articles, contests, covers of books)

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Do you work at improving your photography, or do you just hope for the best? Not everyone wants to take the time to compose a shot, but the payback is a much better photo.  Remember how artists who painted in the open, such as the Impressionists, had to wait for that perfect light?

Do you use your own photos for your blog when you can? Is photography an adjunct to writing or do you sell your photographic work to make it available for use by others?

Please leave a comment to let me know you were here and I'll respond. Thanks for visiting! 

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All images in this post taken in Paris France, by DG Hudson. 

13 comments:

  1. I am learning all the time. And shudder when I look at some early photos - and then cut myself some slack.
    Almost all of the photos I use are my own, and no I don't sell them. I am a happy snapper rather than a photographer.

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    1. I don't sell my photos either, but I've entered contests, and use the photos for my blogs. I've been photographing for friends and myself since hubs gave me my first SLR. My mother was an avid photographer and I must have caught the shutter bug, too.

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  2. Well, since you are a long time reader of my blog, I put a lot into my photography. I have quite a few duds that get deleted. There have been shots I thought were perfect and weren't, and ones where I hoped for the best and it was the shot of a lifetime.

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    1. Those surprise shots are wonderful aren't they? And I know you do put a lot of effort into your photos. It shows.

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  3. I'm just awful at photography and don't claim to be otherwise, so this is all way beyond me, but I can appreciate the time and dedication you put into your photography. Most of my photos are pictures of my cat, and with those, my 'outtakes' are usually of her being one big brown/orange blur because she never sits still.

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    1. Cat in Motion Blur; felines seem curious about cameras, too.

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  4. I am just a quick picture taker - no professional cameras, lenses, stands, etc. here - originally on mostly on those throw away cameras that you didn't have to worry about changing the film (or damaging or losing the camera, beyond losing the pictures you'd taken with it). (Does that date me at all?) I eventually progressed to digital cameras, and I'm now a phone picture taker. I am trying to improve my phone picture taking skills, though.

    As I've updated how I compose and send my email devotional publication, I've begun including pictures I have taken myself. This is not only fun, but it takes away the worries about copyright infringement and proper permission and citation.

    I love taking pictures. "A picture is worth a thousand words." And I'm a details person, so it's not unlike me to take pictures of all the little details. I love traveling and experiences, so the ease of capturing the moment in a picture is quite appealing.

    I love your inclusion of photos that are your own, D.G., because you take such great pictures! And you always tie them into your written work so well, whether coming up with a story from quick visual treat or analyzing the very art of picture taking as you do here. You are truly an artist!

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    1. Thanks, Julie, those are very kind words! I take a lot of my images with their use in mind. An image can cement a memory in our mind.

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  5. The problem with taking pictures most anywhere is that there will be people, crowds, or traffic. I love photography, though. It's one of my passions. :)

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    1. So true, but I've learned patience helps. Going early to the Louvre Museum meant fewer people got in the way of my lens. And not joining a tour group where everyone is trying to get the best angle.

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  6. Thank you! Being mindful and concentrating helps instead of the excitement of the moment, I think.

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    1. So true. Thanks for dropping by, loverofwords! It helps if you aren't travelling with others who can be distracting. . .

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  7. I took a course when I bought my camera that helped me learn a lot of the technicalities such as aperture and shutter speeds.

    Composition, on the other hand, is something I've always had a feeling for.

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