Friday, February 21, 2014

Photography Tips - Composition, Light, and A Louvre Peek

Photographs are a personal interpretation of an object, event or person. The same subject captured by one or more photographers will usually focus on what each person wanted to highlight.


Monochromatic images
Enhances detail


Eiffel Tower, from Pont D'Iena, Paris, DG Hudson



The image of the Eiffel shown above is taken from the Pont D'Iena, when rain was threatening. In this photo,the detail of the ironwork was the object of my intent. Compose your photograph with a few points in mind: purpose of collecting the image, amount of light present, placement or composition of the main focal point or centre of interest.




Natural Light and Shadow

In this photo of an urn caught in the natural light of a window, the shape of the item takes on prominence. The amount of light and shadow softens the detail of the carvings on the exterior of the jar. More contrast could change that, but will darken the overall image. The effect of natural light on objects will continue to change as the sun travels from horizon to horizon.



Urn in Antiquities at the Louvre, by DG Hudson




Repetition of Pattern

Point of view matters. In the two photos following, you see two different angles of the same subject. In the first image, repetition is emphasized by shooting the photo from one side. Framing or composing the shot, which only takes a couple of seconds with digital cameras, allows you to focus on what you want to emphasize.





Antiquities on Guard, Louvre Museum, Paris, by DG Hudson





In this second image below, the photo has been taken facing the sculpture, which emphasizes the details of the hands and feet and shows a group, forever encased in stone. A direct view reveals details of the sculpture not visible from the side angle.





Antiquities at the Louvre Museum, Paris, by DG Hudson



Framing tips: Decide on position or viewpoint, take two or three shots at different angles or exposures, and try to get a clean shot (without people) if you want to use the images for other than family memories. What you choose to include or omit is part of deciding your purpose (travel family photos, or use for blogs, books, or articles, etc.)

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A peek into a workshop at The Louvre Museum

In this monochromatic image of neutrals, we get a peek at the 'behind the scenes work' at one of the world's most famous museums.


Interior Louvre Museum Workshop, Paris by DG Hudson


The framing of the workshop image is provided by the round arched opening and the railing. Inside we see interesting objects, many packed items and artifacts to be listed or displayed. The opening also shows the thickness of the interior castle walls of the Louvre.

Hope you enjoyed the images and the photo tips!

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Do you take photos with your phone, tablet or a separate camera? Do you notice light, pattern or shadow when you take photos?

Please leave a comment and let me know you were here. Thanks for dropping by!

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For more statuary at the Louvre, see:
http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.ca/2012/03/statuary-at-louvre-study-in-stone.html

For more photography, see The Lens (tab at top of page)
http://dghudson.blogspot.ca/p/camera-lens.html

OR a post on the Louvre Museum:
http://dghudson-rainwriting.blogspot.ca/2012/04/l-louvre-museum-to-z-blog-challenge.html

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13 comments:

  1. Love that shot of the Eiffel Tower. And it's funny, I bought a digital camera to take on trips, and I still rely mostly on my iPhone for pictures. It's just easier.

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    1. Hi LG, nice to see you here. I suspect many use their iPhones. I use my phone as a backup.

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  2. I use my digital camera 99% of the time and my crappy cell in a pinch. I went to the Louvre on that school trip when I was in high school....my memory of it was just going so fast through the whole place. We had so much to see and such limited time that they had us running.

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    1. Well now, you can see those statues vicariously. I do have painting photos which I haven't used yet. I saw some of those tours.

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  3. Excellent shots, DG. I'm old-school: I still use a digital camera. No smart phone for me.

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    1. I prefer a camera, too Milo. Digital has given me more freedom in printing my own photos.

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  4. I love these shots, and these are great tips. Even so, I still feel like I know nothing about photography. My main aim is just to get everything inside the picture. Anything I can manage on top of that is a bonus.

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    1. That's a good start. People look funny if their heads get cropped. . .
      I have learned the tips over the years. Hubs kept giving me cameras to keep me occupied. . .

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  5. I bought a camera in Germany because my tablet camera annoyed me.

    As a result, I've developed a style. I tend to focus on texture, detail, depth of field, color and light. But I do like playing with repetition and frames as well.

    I must say, though, that I wouldn't have been so keen on photography if I didn't have such an awesome camera to help me. ;-)

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    1. A good camera gives you many more options, but the person taking the photo decides on the composition.
      Lucky you, getting a new camera!

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  6. Thanks for the tips, I have a digital camera which I use for good quality photos, and a phone which I use for silly photos or for convenience, but my phone camera isn't the best quality and doesn't have a flash which is a bit rubbish!

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  7. Good tips to keep in mind. It also helps to have interesting subject matter like the Louvre!

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  8. Hayley-Eszti Szucs: I hadn't heard of phones without a flash, but the digital shots you've taken have been great!

    Sean: You should know about great shots. Who gets to travel to neat exotic places?(you). . . glad you liked the tips.

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